Home       About us   Issues     Search     Submission Subscribe   Contact    Login 
Conservation and Society
An interdisciplinary journal exploring linkages between society, environment and development
Conservation and Society
Users Online: 1353 Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size

ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 218-224

Assessment of Pest Control Services by Vertebrates in Nigerian Subsistence Maize Farms


1 Department of Biological Sciences, Gombe State University, Gombe, Nigeria
2 School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, Scotland, UK
3 School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand

Correspondence Address:
Murna Tela
Department of Biological Sciences, Gombe State University, Gombe
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: MT was supported by a studentship funded by New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT) through the University of Canterbury, and A.G Leventis educational research grants for doctoral candidates. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript., Conflict of Interest: The authors declare no competing interests in the conduct of this research.


DOI: 10.4103/cs.cs_213_20

Rights and Permissions

Global conversion of patches of natural vegetation into agricultural land is reducing the ecosystem services provided by natural patches dwelling species to farmers. For sub-Saharan African subsistence farmers, such a reduction in pest control services by birds may be a significant disadvantage. Here we explored to what extent birds provide pest control services to the staple crop maize (Zea mays) on small subsistence farms on the Mambilla Plateau of Taraba State, Nigeria. We used exclosure experiments (maize crops with and without birds) to model how birds influenced crop yield. We found that excluding birds from maize significantly reduces crop yield, although the lack of a direct correlation between bird abundance and crop yield suggests that other taxa, such as bats, may also be important pest predators. Our results suggest that in this subsistence farming landscape, natural pest control of maize from vertebrates does occur, but further research is needed to understand the specific control agents and the role of patches of natural vegetation as habitat for them.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed158    
    Printed8    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded30    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal