Home       About us   Issues     Search     Submission Subscribe   Contact    Login 
Conservation and Society
An interdisciplinary journal exploring linkages between society, environment and development
Conservation and Society
Users Online: 353 Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size

RESEARCH ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 325-335

Exploring a Comprehensive Behavioural Model to Investigate Illegal Sea Turtle Trade in Cabo Verde


1 Maio Biodiversity Foundation (FMB), Cidade Porto Inglês, Ilha do Maio, Cabo Verde; Okeanos-UAc Instituto de Investigação em Ciências do Mar, Universidade dos Açores, Rua Prof. Dr. Frederico Machado, Horta, Portugal
2 Maio Biodiversity Foundation (FMB), Cidade Porto Inglês, Ilha do Maio, Cabo Verde
3 Faculdade de Cieências da Universidade de Lisboa; MARE - ULisboa, Lisboa, Portugal
4 Centre for Ecology and Conservation, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter Cornwall Campus, Cornwall, UK; Interdisciplinary Centre of Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences and Humanities, NOVA University Lisbon, Lisboa, Portugal

Correspondence Address:
Morgan Casal Ribeiro
Maio Biodiversity Foundation (FMB), Cidade Porto Inglês, Ilha do Maio, Cabo Verde; Okeanos-UAc Instituto de Investigação em Ciências do Mar, Universidade dos Açores, Rua Prof. Dr. Frederico Machado, Horta

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/cs.cs_98_21

Rights and Permissions

Successful conservation outcomes often depend on changing human behaviours that negatively impact biodiversity, such as unsustainable wildlife harvesting or illegal wildlife trade (IWT). However, inclusive psychology models that examine motivations of those behaviours have been underutilised in IWT contexts. This research examines the drivers of illegal harvesting and consumption of sea turtles on Maio, Cabo Verde (West Africa), by adapting data from interviews (n=20) and questionnaires (n=325) into the Comprehensive Action Determination Model, an environmental psychology theoretical framework. Initial findings suggest local behavioural motivations have changed over time, but key beliefs remained intact. Structural equation modelling showed intention to consume turtles is influenced by positive attitudes towards consumption, but interviews suggest normative personal and social beliefs are becoming relevant to consumptive behaviour mitigation. The same seems true of harvesting, reportedly performed mostly by young men looking to sell turtle by-products. Overall, results indicate the beliefs underlying harvest and consumption behaviours are distinct, such that outreach initiatives must be designed to address each. Results demonstrate how conceptual models developed in underutilised disciplines can be adapted to expand the transdisciplinary tools available to conservation practitioners. Embracing behaviour-focused approaches is crucial to address the intricate cultural and contextual factors of IWT. Abstract in Portuguese: https://bit.ly/3Aj9xuu


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed690    
    Printed14    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded23    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal